A student-led, interprofessional care, community-based healthcare service: Student, clinical educator and client perceptions of interprofessional care and education

Authors

  • Emma M Beckman The University of Queensland
  • Allison Mandrusiak The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
  • Roma Forbes The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
  • Leander Mitchell The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Psychology
  • Marion Tower The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work
  • Brent Cunningham The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Studies
  • Peter Lewis The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11157/fohpe.v23i1.476

Keywords:

Interprofessional relations, interdisciplinary communication, clinical education, allied health

Abstract

Introduction: Interprofessional clinical placements present an opportunity for students to enhance their competence in interprofessional practice. Student-led clinics have been shown to be effective for a variety of outcomes, but the experience of students in relation to their development of skills and the perspectives of clinical educators and clients are unknown. This study aimed to investigate student, clinical educator and client experiences, along with perspectives of interprofessional care and interprofessional education in an interprofessional, community-based health service.Methods: This study implemented a mixed methods design through the administration of self-report surveys, focus groups and semi-structured interviews of key stakeholders, including students undertaking full-time placements, clinical educators and clients, in 2019. Survey data were analysed quantitatively, and qualitative data were subject to thematic analysis.Results: Students reported increased confidence to deliver interprofessional care and attributed this in part to their clinical educators. Clinical educators felt equipped and prepared to deliver interprofessional education activities and displayed high levels of confidence in their ability to provide feedback. Clients were confident in the students’ abilities to be involved in their care and understood the role of the educators. Clients also acknowledged an appreciation of teamwork between students.Conclusions: The results of this study indicate an interprofessional student-led clinical placement increased student confidence in their ability to deliver interprofessional care and emphasised the role of the clinical educator. The perspectives of clients in this paper provide a unique and important viewpoint when considering models of clinical placements that are interprofessional in nature.

Author Biographies

Emma M Beckman, The University of Queensland

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Studies, Senior Lecturer

Allison Mandrusiak, The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Senior Lecturer

Roma Forbes, The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Lecturer

Leander Mitchell, The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Psychology

School of Psychology, Senior Lecturer

Marion Tower, The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work

 School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, Senior Lecturer

Brent Cunningham, The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Studies

School of Human Movement and Nutrition Studies, Research assistant

Peter Lewis, The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, Associate Professor

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Published

2022-03-31

Issue

Section

Interprofessional learning