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Novel interprofessional learning for healthcare students: An escape room pilot

Leigh Moore, Narelle Campbell

Abstract


Introduction: Interprofessional practice is an important contributor to improved patient outcomes, yet interprofessional learning (IPL) has proven challenging to implement. With responsibility for a cohort of students from many universities and disciplines, attending placements of various lengths and dates, the Flinders Northern Territory Remote and Rural Interprofessional Placement Learning program needed a novel way to overcome barriers to IPL.

Innovation: An “escape room”, an immersive team-based activity with puzzles and problem solving, was developed specifically for this program. The room has an interprofessional healthcare theme and can be transported in a suitcase to enable use in almost any placement site.

What next? The next steps will focus on refining the learning objectives, developing the post-room debrief and exploring the escape room’s use for formative assessment. In addition, we plan to replicate the room across our sites, develop an additional scenario and undertake ongoing evaluation of the room and associated student learning outcomes.

Evaluation: The room was run as a pilot in three stages – briefing, solving the room and debriefing. The pilot room was evaluated in multiple ways: observation of participants before, during and after the room; participant evaluation questionnaires; free-flow discussion after participation; and through written and verbal feedback received. A shortened version was presented to ANZAHPE conference attendees, with observers asked to provide feedback. The room was evaluated for participant engagement and perceived learning value.

Outcomes: The evaluation findings indicate that the escape room activity was very enjoyable, encouraged participant engagement, suited many professions, was transportable and showed promise as an interprofessional learning platform. Additionally, it provided unexpected benefits, including networking opportunities, staff engagement and peer support possibilities.

What next? The next steps will focus on refining the learning objectives, developing the post-room debrief and exploring the escape room’s use for formative assessment. In addition, we plan to replicate the room across our sites, develop an additional scenario and undertake ongoing evaluation of the room and associated student learning outcomes.


Keywords


interprofessional; education; student; health

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11157/fohpe.v20i1.306

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